Sep
27
Wed
Conservation Night
Sep 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Join us for the sixth annual Conservation Night featuring some of the most important books in our historical collections.  We will unveil the conserved volumes — books sponsored by generous participants of the 2016 Conservation Night — and present more ailing books for your consideration.  Executive Director Jean Marie Procious will give an illustrated presentation about the books and their value to the collection.
Open to the public: book sponsorship is always appreciated but is not required to attend.
Adopt one of these treasures on September 27:

1.  The works of Anna Letitia Barbauld with a memoir by Lucy Aikin, in three volumes.  Boston : David Reed, 1826.
$550 or 2 shares of $275

2. The principles of mechanics. Explaining and demonstrating the general laws of motion, the laws of gravity, motions of descending bodies, projectiles, mechanic powers, pendulums, centers of gravity, etc. strength and stress of timber, hydrostatics,  and construction of machines.  A work very necessary to be known by all Gentlemen, and others, that desire to have an insight into the works of nature and art.  And extremely useful to all sorts of artificers; particularly to architects, engineers, shipwrights, millwrights, watchmakers, etc. or any that work in a mechanical way.  The second edition, corrected and very much enlarged. With 43 copper plates.  London: J. Richardson, 1758.
$550 or 2 shares of $275

 

3. The analysis of beauty. Written with a view of fixing the fluctuating ideas of taste.  By William Hogarth.  London : J. Reeves, 1753.
$550 or 2 shares of $275

 

4. A treatise on the social compact or the principles of politic law.  By J. J. Rousseau.  London : T. Becket and P. A. de Hondt, 1764.
$480 or 4 shares of $120

 

5.  Observations on the climate in different parts of America, compared with the climate in corresponding parts of the other continent.  To which are added remarks on the different complexions of the human race: with some account of the Aborigines of America. Being an introductory discourse to the History of North Carolina.  By Hugh Williamson, M.D. LL. D.  New York : T. & J. Swords, 1811.
$500 or 2 shares of $250

6.  Principles of Polity, being the grounds and reasons of civil empire. In three parts.  By Thomas Pownall, Esq.  London :  Edward Owen, 1752.  [This copy has a full page presentation letter to the President, Fellows, and Students of Harvard College from the author].
$800 or 4 shares of $200

7.  A state of the expedition from Canada as laid before the House of Commons by Lieutenant-General Burgoyne, and verified by evidence; with a collection of authentic documents, and an addition of many circumstances which were prevented from appearing before the House by the prorogation of Parliament.  John Burgoyne.  Second edition.  London. J. Almon, 1780.
$550 or 2 shares of $275

8.  An account of the Pelew Islands, situated in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. Composed from the journals and communications of Captain Henry Wilson, and some of his officers, who, in August 1783, were there shipwrecked, in the Antelope,  a packet belonging to the Honourable East India Company.  By George Keate, Esq. F. R. S. and S. A.  Fourth edition.  London : Captain Wilson, 1789.
$550 or 2 shares of $275

9.  Principles of Electricity, containing  divers new theorems and experiments, together with an analysis of the superior advantages of high and pointed conductors. This treatise comprehends an explanation of an electrical returning stroke, by which, fatal effects may be produced, even at a vast distance from the place where the lightning falls.  By Charles Viscount Mahon, F. R. S. [Charles Stanhope Stanhope].  London : P. Elmsly, 1774.
$500 or 2 shares of $250

10.  Just and impartial narrative of the controversy between the Rev. Mr. Samuel Fisk the Pastor, and a number of the brethren of the First Church of Christ in Salem. [and other pamphlets].  Boston : Thomas Fleet, 1735.
$450 or 3 shares of $150

11.  Moby Dick.  By Herman Melville.  New York : Harper & Brothers.
$460 or 2 shares of $230

12.  Travels in the interior districts of Africa: performed under the direction and patronage of the African Association in the years 1795, 1796, and 1797. By Mungo Park, surgeon.  With an appendix containing geographical illustrations of Africa.  By Major Rennell.  London : Printed by W. Bulmer and Co.; and sold by G. and W. Nicol, 1799.
$600 or 3 shares of $200

13.  Carey’s General Atlas: containing: 1. Map of the world, 2. Chart of the world, 3. Europe, etc.  Philadelphia: Published by Matthew Carey.  May 1, 1796.
$840 or 4 Shares $210

14. Navigantium atque Itinerantium  Bibliotheca, or a complete collection of voyages and travels consisting of six hundred of the most authentic writers beginning with Hackluit, Purchass, et in English . . . together with such other histories, voyages, travels, or discoveries as are in general esteem whether published in English, Latin, French [etc.] . . . containing whatever has been observed worthy of notice in Europe, Asia, Africa, and America . . . illustrated by proper charts, maps, and cuts to which is prefixed a copious introduction comprising the rise and progress of the art of navigation . . .By John Harris.  London : T. Woodward, et al.  1744.  Two volumes.
$3760 or 16 shares of $235

15.  A Summary History of New-England, from the first settlement at Plymouth to the acceptance of the Federal Constitution comprehending a general sketch of the American War.  By Hannah Adams.  Dedham : H. Mann and J. H. Adams, 1799.
$540 or 4 shares of $135

Oct
4
Wed
Introducing Salem Artist Quinton Oliver Jones (1903-1999)
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

This lecture presented by Connie Gephart orients viewers to the Athenaeum’s Fall-Winter Exhibit of Quinton Oliver Jones.

Salem native Quinton Oliver Jones (1903-1999), was a reclusive Harvard-trained artist whose paintings and sculptures filled his home to the brim. This Fall the Salem Athenaeum presents an exhibition drawn from Quinton’s body of work, most of which has never been seen by the public before. Discover his colorful, fantastical visions and learn about the world in which he lived and drew inspiration for his artwork.

Oct
5
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
11
Wed
Incessant Pipe: Contentions
Oct 11 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Philosophy, Science, and Ideas. Come sit around a medium-large table and discuss the big stuff.

2nd Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Oct
12
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
13
Fri
Ziad Hamzeh
Oct 13 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Acclaimed filmmaker and Syrian native, Ziad Hamzeh, will discuss his films and give an artist’s perspective on the refugee crisis.

A Director, Producer, and Writer, Ziad’s work has earned over 40 awards and honors. Presently Ziad is in pre-production for the film Sushi Tushi slotted to begin filming in New York May 2017. Most recently he produced the film The Flower of Aleppo in Tunis which is slotted to be the opening film at the Carthage Film Festival this October. The film was chosen to be Tunisia’s entry into the 2017 Oscar and the Golden Globe Awards.

In April Ziad’s film Irrefutable Proof swept the Beverly Hills Film Festival earning three top awards. The Golden Palm for Ziad, Best actress, and best cinematography. Ziad shared The Abu Dhabi Film Festival’s Black Pearl Award for Best Producer with acclaimed Tunisian filmmaker Ridha Behi for Always Brando, which had its world premiere at The Toronto International Film Festival. Always Brando also received the Jury prize at The Algerian Film Festival and the Best Picture Award at The Alexandria Film Festival.

Ziad teaches advanced and graduate classes in filmmaking at Lesky University and Emerson College.  He earned an M.F.A. in directing from California State University, Fullerton, an M.A. in writing and criticism from California State University, Los Angeles, and a BA in theatre from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Oct
19
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 19 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
21
Sat
Finding Your Medium
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

What’s your medium? Every writer searches for the right format to tell their own stories in. During this interactive discussion, talk with a working poet, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, and more about the challenges and benefits of their chosen medium, how they got there, and how to find your own voice as a writer.

Finding Your Medium will begin with an interactive panel discussion, providing each writer a chance to talk about how they arrived at their chosen medium, if they’ve worked in any other formats, and how their journey affected their current work and perspective on their medium. Then the audience will be invited to bring their own questions to the table–be as general or specific as you like. Trying to find your own medium? Considering testing out another? Wondering how trying out one format might make you a better writer in another? Take advantage of having writers of different paths ready to discuss the ins and outs of their medium–and yours!
Matthew Phillion is the author of the young adult adventure series, The Indestructibles. He writes in a variety of genres. As an active freelance writer, Phillion continues to write about both local issues and the medical industry as both a journalist and newspaper editor.
Cambridge Society for Early Music concert
Oct 21 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

The Art of Counterpoint: from Bach to Zelenka

CSEM’s 2017 season begins with two of the great High Baroque masters–J. S. Bach and Jan Dismas Zelenka. These two musicians knew and admired each other, and worked in close proximity: Bach in Leipzig, Zelenka in Dresden, just 100 miles away.

Formed in 2013, Kleine Kammermusik is dedicated to bringing to life the wealth of music from 17th- and 18th-century Europe. With paired treble woodwind instruments (oboe and recorder) and supportive continuo group of mixed woodwind, string, and keyboard, the group comprises a versatile blend of instruments suited to music from a wide range of contexts: from vivid outdoor celebrations and military fanfares to intimate chamber works. Each member of the group is a leading exponent and holds prominent posts in early music ensembles across the North East of the U.S.A. Together they bring superb artistry and a high level of virtuosity to music full of dazzling surprises and beguiling charm. In addition to being fine virtuoso players in their own right, the members of Kleine Kammermusik have developed an intuitive approach, and their musical rapport produces performances of superb artistic control and unmistakable elegance.

Oct
23
Mon
John Carroll: State of the Media
Oct 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Donald in Wonderland

How Trump Took the News Media Through the Looking Glass

NPR analyst and Boston University mass communication professor John Carroll talks about the role of journalism in a post-fact political universe.

John R. Carroll is a mass communication professor at Boston University, media analyst for NPR’s Here & Now, and senior news analyst at WBUR.

For six years prior to joining the BU faculty, Carroll was the executive producer of Greater Boston, WGBH-TV’s nightly news and public affairs program. He was also a radio commentator for WGBH-FM, and a correspondent for WGBH-TV’s Beat the Press, a weekly media review program.

During his television career, Carroll has won nine New England Emmy awards, mostly for news writing and commentary. He is also the recipient of the RTNDA’s National Edward R. Murrow award for writing, and a three-time winner of the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism.

Previously Carroll was a commentator for National Public Radio’s All Things Considered and On the Media, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. He has also been a columnist for the Boston Globe and Adweek.

His blogs include: https://campaignoutsider.com/, https://itsgoodtoliveinatwodailytown.com/, http://sneakadtack.com/