Oct
3
Tue
Salem Writers’ Group
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

All are welcome to bring work-in-progress to share with the group for feedback. The group is facilitated by J.D. Scrimgeour, Professor of English, Salem State University.

Oct
4
Wed
Introducing Salem Artist Quinton Oliver Jones (1903-1999)
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

This lecture presented by Connie Gephart orients viewers to the Athenaeum’s Fall-Winter Exhibit of Quinton Oliver Jones.

Salem native Quinton Oliver Jones (1903-1999), was a reclusive Harvard-trained artist whose paintings and sculptures filled his home to the brim. This Fall the Salem Athenaeum presents an exhibition drawn from Quinton’s body of work, most of which has never been seen by the public before. Discover his colorful, fantastical visions and learn about the world in which he lived and drew inspiration for his artwork.

Oct
5
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
11
Wed
Incessant Pipe: Contentions
Oct 11 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Philosophy, Science, and Ideas. Come sit around a medium-large table and discuss the big stuff.

2nd Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Oct
12
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
13
Fri
Ziad Hamzeh
Oct 13 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Acclaimed filmmaker and Syrian native, Ziad Hamzeh, will discuss his films and give an artist’s perspective on the refugee crisis.

A Director, Producer, and Writer, Ziad’s work has earned over 40 awards and honors. Presently Ziad is in pre-production for the film Sushi Tushi slotted to begin filming in New York May 2017. Most recently he produced the film The Flower of Aleppo in Tunis which is slotted to be the opening film at the Carthage Film Festival this October. The film was chosen to be Tunisia’s entry into the 2017 Oscar and the Golden Globe Awards.

In April Ziad’s film Irrefutable Proof swept the Beverly Hills Film Festival earning three top awards. The Golden Palm for Ziad, Best actress, and best cinematography. Ziad shared The Abu Dhabi Film Festival’s Black Pearl Award for Best Producer with acclaimed Tunisian filmmaker Ridha Behi for Always Brando, which had its world premiere at The Toronto International Film Festival. Always Brando also received the Jury prize at The Algerian Film Festival and the Best Picture Award at The Alexandria Film Festival.

Ziad teaches advanced and graduate classes in filmmaking at Lesky University and Emerson College.  He earned an M.F.A. in directing from California State University, Fullerton, an M.A. in writing and criticism from California State University, Los Angeles, and a BA in theatre from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Oct
17
Tue
Salem Writers’ Group
Oct 17 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

All are welcome to bring work-in-progress to share with the group for feedback. The group is facilitated by J.D. Scrimgeour, Professor of English, Salem State University.

Oct
19
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 19 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Oct
20
Fri
Phantoms, Fraud, and Photography
Oct 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Join us for a spirited book talk in the iconic gothic chapel at Harmony Grove with Peter Manseau, award-winning author and Curator of Religion for the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

More than just a ghost story, this is a portrait of a young nation struggling to separate fact from fiction. Manseau details the trial of William H. Mumler, the “spirit photographer” who claimed he could take pictures of the souls of the dead, along with the battlefield exploits of Mathew Brady and Alexander Gardner, the fathers of photojournalism who created frauds of their own. These stories offer a view of our nation’s obsession with the afterlife and our reluctance to choose science over fantasy.

Following the talk, books will be available for sale and signing.

Reservations are strongly recommended. Admission is $5 and free for members of the hosting organizations.

The event is hosted by Harmony Grove Cemetery, the Salem Athenaeum, and the Salem Historical Society.

Oct
21
Sat
Finding Your Medium
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

What’s your medium? Every writer searches for the right format to tell their own stories in. During this interactive discussion, talk with a working poet, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, and more about the challenges and benefits of their chosen medium, how they got there, and how to find your own voice as a writer.

Finding Your Medium will begin with an interactive panel discussion, providing each writer a chance to talk about how they arrived at their chosen medium, if they’ve worked in any other formats, and how their journey affected their current work and perspective on their medium. Then the audience will be invited to bring their own questions to the table–be as general or specific as you like. Trying to find your own medium? Considering testing out another? Wondering how trying out one format might make you a better writer in another? Take advantage of having writers of different paths ready to discuss the ins and outs of their medium–and yours!
Matthew Phillion is the author of the young adult adventure series, The Indestructibles. He writes in a variety of genres. As an active freelance writer, Phillion continues to write about both local issues and the medical industry as both a journalist and newspaper editor.