Oct
23
Mon
John Carroll: State of the Media
Oct 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Donald in Wonderland

How Trump Took the News Media Through the Looking Glass

NPR analyst and Boston University mass communication professor John Carroll talks about the role of journalism in a post-fact political universe.

John R. Carroll is a mass communication professor at Boston University, media analyst for NPR’s Here & Now, and senior news analyst at WBUR.

For six years prior to joining the BU faculty, Carroll was the executive producer of Greater Boston, WGBH-TV’s nightly news and public affairs program. He was also a radio commentator for WGBH-FM, and a correspondent for WGBH-TV’s Beat the Press, a weekly media review program.

During his television career, Carroll has won nine New England Emmy awards, mostly for news writing and commentary. He is also the recipient of the RTNDA’s National Edward R. Murrow award for writing, and a three-time winner of the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism.

Previously Carroll was a commentator for National Public Radio’s All Things Considered and On the Media, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. He has also been a columnist for the Boston Globe and Adweek.

His blogs include: https://campaignoutsider.com/, https://itsgoodtoliveinatwodailytown.com/, http://sneakadtack.com/

Oct
24
Tue
La Tertulia
Oct 24 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

La Tertulia is a group of members interested in keeping their Spanish speaking skills in practice. They meet on 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month.

Incessant Pipe Poetry Salon
Oct 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The Incessant Pipe Poetry Salon will meet on the 4th Tuesday of every month at 7pm upstairs in the Salem Athenaeum. “The Pipe” is a space to read poetry, yours or others, and discuss everything from the price of tea in China to quantum particles (as long as it relates back to poetry). All styles of poetry are welcome.

Oct
26
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 26 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Nov
2
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Nov 2 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Nov
5
Sun
Writing the Next Chapter with Our Refugee Neighbors—Exhibit
Nov 5 @ 3:00 pm – Nov 11 @ 2:00 pm

A temporary exhibit connected with the presentations on November 5 will be on display at the Salem Athenaeum through November 11. 

Read the Refugee Neighbors Transcripts (PDF)

This event will encompass an informative panel discussion regarding several local refugees and their experiences moving to the North Shore. A reception will follow, and though their demanding schedules are often erratic, several refugees do hope to attend.

Salem State Professor Elisabeth Weiss Horowitz, inspired by a recent exhibit at Government Center, as well as her work with Catholic Charities, created this program to both assist with English language instruction, and introduce these new neighbors to our community.

Her panel includes photographer Leah Bokenkamp, as well as fellow local writers M.P. Carver, Shari D. Frost, Danielle Jones-Pruett and Keri Snook, who will share intimate portraits and interviews that offer a glimpse into the challenges refugees face settling into a new culture and community. In addition, each writer will present a creative work.

Nov
6
Mon
Adams Lecture: Gordon Wood
Nov 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

 

Pulitzer-winning historian Gordon S. Wood discusses his new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams could scarcely have come from more different worlds, or been more different in temperament. Jefferson, the optimist with enough faith in the innate goodness of his fellow man to be democracy’s champion, was an aristocratic Southern slave owner, while Adams, the overachiever from New England’s rising middling classes, painfully aware he was no aristocrat, was a skeptic about popular rule and a defender of a more elitist view of government. Their profound differences would lead to a fundamental crisis, in their friendship and in the nation writ large, as they became the figureheads of two entirely new forces, the first American political parties. But late in life, something remarkable happened: these two men were nudged into reconciliation. What started as a grudging trickle of correspondence became a great flood, and a friendship was rekindled, over the course of hundreds of letters.

Gordon S. Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and professor of history at Brown University. His books have received the Pulitzer, Bancroft and John H. Dunning prizes, as well as a National Book Award nomination and the New York Historical Society Prize in American History. They include Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, Revolutionary Characters, The Purpose of the Past, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin, and The Idea of America.

Nov
7
Tue
Salem Writers’ Group
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

All are welcome to bring work-in-progress to share with the group for feedback. The group is facilitated by J.D. Scrimgeour, Professor of English, Salem State University.

Nov
8
Wed
Incessant Pipe: Contentions
Nov 8 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Philosophy, Science, and Ideas. Come sit around a medium-large table and discuss the big stuff.

2nd Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Nov
9
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Nov 9 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).