Oct
26
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Oct 26 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Nov
2
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Nov 2 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Nov
5
Sun
Writing the Next Chapter with Our Refugee Neighbors—Exhibit
Nov 5 @ 3:00 pm – Nov 11 @ 2:00 pm

A temporary exhibit connected with the presentations on November 5 will be on display at the Salem Athenaeum through November 11. 

Read the Refugee Neighbors Transcripts (PDF)

This event will encompass an informative panel discussion regarding several local refugees and their experiences moving to the North Shore. A reception will follow, and though their demanding schedules are often erratic, several refugees do hope to attend.

Salem State Professor Elisabeth Weiss Horowitz, inspired by a recent exhibit at Government Center, as well as her work with Catholic Charities, created this program to both assist with English language instruction, and introduce these new neighbors to our community.

Her panel includes photographer Leah Bokenkamp, as well as fellow local writers M.P. Carver, Shari D. Frost, Danielle Jones-Pruett and Keri Snook, who will share intimate portraits and interviews that offer a glimpse into the challenges refugees face settling into a new culture and community. In addition, each writer will present a creative work.

Nov
6
Mon
Adams Lecture: Gordon Wood
Nov 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

 

Pulitzer-winning historian Gordon S. Wood discusses his new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams could scarcely have come from more different worlds, or been more different in temperament. Jefferson, the optimist with enough faith in the innate goodness of his fellow man to be democracy’s champion, was an aristocratic Southern slave owner, while Adams, the overachiever from New England’s rising middling classes, painfully aware he was no aristocrat, was a skeptic about popular rule and a defender of a more elitist view of government. Their profound differences would lead to a fundamental crisis, in their friendship and in the nation writ large, as they became the figureheads of two entirely new forces, the first American political parties. But late in life, something remarkable happened: these two men were nudged into reconciliation. What started as a grudging trickle of correspondence became a great flood, and a friendship was rekindled, over the course of hundreds of letters.

Gordon S. Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and professor of history at Brown University. His books have received the Pulitzer, Bancroft and John H. Dunning prizes, as well as a National Book Award nomination and the New York Historical Society Prize in American History. They include Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, Revolutionary Characters, The Purpose of the Past, The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin, and The Idea of America.

Nov
7
Tue
Salem Writers’ Group
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

All are welcome to bring work-in-progress to share with the group for feedback. The group is facilitated by J.D. Scrimgeour, Professor of English, Salem State University.

Nov
8
Wed
Incessant Pipe: Contentions
Nov 8 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Philosophy, Science, and Ideas. Come sit around a medium-large table and discuss the big stuff.

2nd Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Nov
9
Thu
Tennessee Williams Course
Nov 9 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7 Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. — October 5-November 16

Last fall, we considered the plays of Arthur Miller, one of the two greatest American playwrights of the mid-twentieth century. In this fall’s 7-week course, we will examine the work of the other great playwright of this period: Tennessee Williams. While Miller’s realistic plays were rooted in the industrial North, Williams’ expressionistic dramas seemed to be thoroughly Southern.

Upon closer examination, we discover that Williams’ plays constitute a much broader critique of post-war America with its ambivalent attitudes towards class, success, sexuality, and outsiderness. As a technical innovator, Williams was the true master, as even Miller had to concede. Through an examination of his life, his recorded conversations and published essays, we will also learn how Williams transformed his life experiences into bold dramas; how he felt about the American theater in his time, the price of fame, the critical reviews he received, and the filmed adaptations of his works. On several occasions, we will view filmed versions of the plays in class.

Plays to be considered are:

The Glass Menagerie (1944)
A Streetcar Named Desire (1949)
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
Orpheus Descending (1957)
Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
Night of the Iguana (1961).

Nov
11
Sat
Quinton Oliver Jones Studio Tour
Nov 11 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Enjoy a special opportunity to experience the environment in which Quinton Oliver Jones created his fantastical paintings. A guided tour of his former home, including his workspace and many more paintings, will be part of the experience. A small reception is included. Reservations required. Limited availability.

The paintings of Quinton Oliver Jones occupy a fantastical, vividly imaginative space. Swirling landscapes inhabited by human and animal figures, codes and symbols, evoke dreams or fairy tales where anything can happen. His inventive use of colors outside of nature to describe the natural world turn landscapes into dreamscapes, often with a vibrating, sometimes eerie glow. The human characters often seem at the mercy of whimsical, hybrid animal creatures that rule the canvases, adding a psychological element.

 

Book Group
Nov 11 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Discussion group meets on the second Saturday of the month at 11:00 a.m.

View the reading list.

Garden Clean-up Day
Nov 11 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
After surveying the grounds, the following tasks have been chosen for our annual Fall Clean-up session:
1.      Gather fallen branches
2.      Prune seasonal plants
3.      Rake leaves
4.      Plant spring flower bulbs.
We hope you can make it on Saturday!